We’re All Living in Youngstown Now

Today’s professional white collar workers are about to get the same treatment as steel and auto workers received in the 1970s and 80s. Back then the narrative was unequivocal. Manufacturing was dominated by overpaid highly unionized workers who were lazy and entitled. Wages and benefits were too high. Productivity and innovation were being stifled by … Read more We’re All Living in Youngstown Now

Small Is Beautiful: How Small Groups Can Transform Large Parishes

Week after week attending Sunday Mass at her newfound parish, Mariette Coolidge had not yet made a friend. She had uprooted her life in California after the death of her husband and moved to Huntersville knowing nobody but her immediate family. As a community of 8,000 souls, St. Mark’s Catholic Church looked formidable. “I met … Read more Small Is Beautiful: How Small Groups Can Transform Large Parishes

Class, Not Race, Divides America

The next time we hear a lecture about caring from a woke Yale professor, or a sermon on systematic racism from a CEO, or more Hollywood confessional video drivel, we should pause and politely ask, “But where do your children go to school? And why do you live where you live? And dine with whom … Read more Class, Not Race, Divides America

The Virus’s Uneven Path: Working-class communities face mounting economic stress

In this miserable Covid-19 spring, it’s tempting for remote workers to vent our frustrations with being hemmed in, forced to stare at screens while unable to do much else other than walk around the block or go to Costco. Yet the pain felt by the teleworking middle class is dwarfed by that of working-class Americans. … Read more The Virus’s Uneven Path: Working-class communities face mounting economic stress

The Conservative Case for the U.S. Postal Service

The Postal Service is financially burdened by a mandate to pre-fund its retiree’s healthcare benefits decades in advance—a requirement that does not apply to any other branch of government (or private corporation). This directive had placed the Postal Service in a precarious financial position even before the economy was shut down due to COVID-19, so … Read more The Conservative Case for the U.S. Postal Service

Heritage Foundation: More than half of all U.S. counties report zero COVID-19 deaths

More than half of all U.S. counties have reported no coronavirus-related deaths, an analysis by the Heritage Foundation shows. In light of the data, the Heritage Foundation created a National Coronavirus Recovery Commission to offer policy solutions to lawmakers to avert an economic depression “regardless of whether COVID-19 is suppressed in the next several months … Read more Heritage Foundation: More than half of all U.S. counties report zero COVID-19 deaths

Local Farms and Food

LocalHarvest.org Local Harvest – Local Farms, Farmers Markets, Food Co-ops, Pick Your Own, Farm Stands Farm Match – Small Farms and Buying Clubs Related Posts“Organic” – Missouri charmer led double life, masterminded one of the biggest frauds in farm history Dairies in Trouble: Borden Makes Surprise Bankruptcy Filing How to stop the coming meat shortage … Read more Local Farms and Food

No students. No graduation. ‘Total devastation’ in college towns during coronavirus pandemic

Before the closures, no one could have imagined that for Clemson’s (South Carolina) 50-year-old downtown district. The football team’s run of championship contenders and a 30% rise in enrollment since 2010 propelled a surge on College Avenue after the 2008 economic recession and road construction that discouraged traffic through the area. Now, the open parking … Read more No students. No graduation. ‘Total devastation’ in college towns during coronavirus pandemic

Quarantine Fatigue and the Social End to the Coronavirus Pandemic

So what might learning to live with COVID-19 look like? Keeping firmly in mind that all models are imperfect, the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation’s (IHME) model recently raised its projection of U.S. COVID-19 deaths to 137,000 by the beginning of August. In comparison, the model developed by Youyang Gu and … Read more Quarantine Fatigue and the Social End to the Coronavirus Pandemic

As Food Supply Chain Breaks Down, Farm-To-Door CSAs Take Off

Images of some American farmers dumping milk, plowing under crops and tossing perishables amid sagging demand and falling prices during the deadly coronavirus pandemic has made for dramatic TV. But it’s not the whole story. “We had a reporter call here and say, ‘We want to see some produce rotting in the field and milk … Read more As Food Supply Chain Breaks Down, Farm-To-Door CSAs Take Off

The Human Cost of ‘Culling’ Livestock and ‘Depopulating’ Farms

Unfolding this month, in the background of the pandemic, is a “depopulation” of livestock farms — another surreal new term of the crisis to add to our list. It’s as detached and colorless a word as the industry could find for gassing, suffocating, or otherwise doing in the millions of animals whose appointments at the … Read more The Human Cost of ‘Culling’ Livestock and ‘Depopulating’ Farms

Federal Red Tape Is Keeping Local Meat Processors From Helping Fix Our Supply Problem

The increasing possibility of a breakdown in the meat supply chain in the United States due to COVID-19 is prompting Rep. Thomas Massie (R–Ky.) to renew his push for a bill that would make it easier for small, independent slaughterhouses and meat processors to sell directly to consumers. Large meatpacking plants across the country have … Read more Federal Red Tape Is Keeping Local Meat Processors From Helping Fix Our Supply Problem

Farmers’ Markets Adapt to Survive In the ‘New Public Square’

It can sorely be hoped that shutdowns don’t imperil the long-term health of one of the most intensely local of our retail institutions, farmers’ markets. Most states permitted them to continue functioning under lockdown orders. (Virginia was one exception but has since permitted them.) But many markets shut down anyway or canceled or delayed starts … Read more Farmers’ Markets Adapt to Survive In the ‘New Public Square’

The New Class War Comes For The Economy

The coronavirus is being politicized. We hear it all the time. A recent headline at The Atlantic reads: “The Social-Distancing Culture War Has Begun.” On the New York Times opinion page, a contributor laments: “The reopen America protests are the logical conclusion of a twisted liberty movement.” And Vox suspects that GOP megadonors backed recent … Read more The New Class War Comes For The Economy

Most U.S. Hospitals Are Empty. Soon They Might Be Closed for Good | Opinion

Tens of thousands of health care workers across the United States are going without pay today, even as providers in the nation’s hot spots struggle to contain the coronavirus pandemic This “tale of two hospitals” is a function of clumsy, if well-intentioned, federal and state directives to halt all non-emergency procedures, which appeared at first … Read more Most U.S. Hospitals Are Empty. Soon They Might Be Closed for Good | Opinion

Where Will You Live in the Post Covid-19 Future?

Cities are cramped, sprawling suburbs are a dead end. That leaves two places well equipped for uncertain times. he Covid-19 corona virus has suddenly accelerated two momentous historical trends long lurking in the background of everyday life, but generally taken for granted until the crisis forced these issues: the end of globalism as we knew … Read more Where Will You Live in the Post Covid-19 Future?

Multinational Meat Farms Could Be Making Us Sick

In the last two weeks, there have been two coronavirus outbreaks at Smithfield Foods facilities in South Dakota and Wisconsin, with charges of cover-ups and bad handling practices. Among other issues, this exposes the inherent risk of handing control of our meat supply to the multinational agribusiness cartel. Late last year, New Jersey Senator Cory … Read more Multinational Meat Farms Could Be Making Us Sick

A New Exodus to the Countryside Could Be Fun

The health and economic crisis will see some people leaving the city. Are we prepared for the radical change? . . . Most of us have ancestors who swapped fields for the cement at some point. Very few of us were preceded by 20 generations of tarmac treaders. It may be that the history of … Read more A New Exodus to the Countryside Could Be Fun

While the economy goes bust, farm-to-table booms

MIDDLETOWN, Maryland — There is an argument to be made that the coronavirus pandemic could change the food supply chain for the long term. It may disrupt our across-the-board reliance on distant producers, processing plants, and large chain grocery stores. In the process, it would connect many of us to local food in the same … Read more While the economy goes bust, farm-to-table booms

Locavores were resetting the American table. Then came a pandemic.

With farm-to-table restaurants takeout-only and many farmers markets closed, locavores are concerned that the pandemic could undo the progress of their movement. Others believe the crisis only highlights how vital local supply chains are. . . . America’s globalized food supply chain is groaning under the weight of a national emergency. As the baskets overflowed … Read more Locavores were resetting the American table. Then came a pandemic.

Hazleton [PA] meat-packaging plant closes with 130 workers testing positive for COVID-19

Cargill Meat Solutions, a 900-worker plant in Hazleton, Pa., that packages meat in plastic for supermarket shelves in Pennsylvania and surrounding states, has shut down temporarily after 130 hourly workers tested positive for COVID-19 and a rash of employees called out sick, a union leader said. Also this week, the Philadelphia Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed … Read more Hazleton [PA] meat-packaging plant closes with 130 workers testing positive for COVID-19

How I Joined the Resistance

I often wonder what my grandmother—Mamaw, as I called her—would have thought about her grandson becoming Catholic. We used to argue about religion constantly. She was a woman of deep, but completely de-institutionalized, faith. She loved Billy Graham and Donald Ison, a preacher from her home in southeastern Kentucky. But she loathed “organized religion.” She … Read more How I Joined the Resistance

Factory Farming – CAFO

  Joel Salatin: Breaking Free From Factory Farms   Contrary to common belief, Senator Cory Booker’s best idea wasn’t dropping out of the 2020 presidential race. That was his second-best idea. His best idea was introducing the Farm System Reform Bill of 2019 to the U.S. Senate. This legislation would curtail concentrated animal-feeding operations (CAFOs), … Read more Factory Farming – CAFO

Milk and Food

The nasty little virus that is upending our lives bears much of the blame, but misguided policies are making a bad situation worse. Grocery stores could take up more of the slack if they were free to price and sell milk according to consumer demand. But, laws against “price gouging” keep the retail prices of … Read more Milk and Food

Coronavirus, Labor, and an Aging World

In the last few months [Feb. – April 2020], we have gradually realized the dire nature of this global pandemic, and our response has been? Nothing short of the creation of a new world: hopefully not on the ruins of the last. The novel coronavirus is showing us the downside of accelerated mobility, excessive attention … Read more Coronavirus, Labor, and an Aging World